More evidence that near death experiences are related to brain activity, not the supernatural.

Many think they leave their body and up above their body can look down on things and thus say this is proof of life out side of death. But this is just more wishful thinking as always. To date, six studies have tried some form of this method, mostly on cardiac-arrest patients, and all have failed to find an ironclad case of veridical perception. All involved placing some stimulus—a picture or a symbol on, say, a piece of paper or an electronic display—in a high location, visible only if you were floating near the ceiling. The research designers did their best to make sure that nobody—not the doctors or nurses, not the patient, and not whoever interviewed the patient afterward—would know what the stimulus was until after the interviews were over.

The Science of Near-Death-Experiences

Evidence Near-Death-Experiences are not Supernatural

Illustration from Anthropogenie showing “very early”, “somewhat later” and “still later” stages of embryos of fish (F), salamander (A), turtle (T), chick (H), pig (S), cow (R), rabbit (K), and human (M)

We are evolution not some special creation. It is a flaw in reasoning to think that we evolved naturally and then somehow magically got some supernatural soul.

When in the evolution of humans do you think magic happened to make humans have a soul to live after death anyway? Simply there is none, belief in souls or life after death is just wishful thinking. We are not magic filled nor are we that different than other primates….

In fact the chimpanzee and human genomes are more than 98% identical, but there are a few short DNA sequences that have changed significantly in humans since the two species diverged about 5 million years ago. Most of the big differences between human and chimpanzee DNA lie in regions that do not code for genes, according to a new study. Instead, they may contain DNA sequences that control how gene-coding regions are activated and read.

Most of the big differences between human and chimpanzee DNA lie in regions that do not code for genes, according to a new study. Instead, they may contain DNA sequences that control how gene-coding regions are activated and read.

Comparing Chimp, Human DNA

By Damien Marie AtHope