Religious Art: “Venus” More Than Sex or Motherhood

The above picture comes from: Human Odyssey The term “venus” which is an umbrella term for a number of prehistoric statuettes of women which was not always but often are highly stylized depictions carved from stone, bone, ivory, or ceramic. A study on the many venuses or goddess figurines found claims that less than half of these figurines could possibly represent pregnancy. Another study of the relation of the depiction assigned “venus” into one of three age groups: around one quarter where pre-reproductive, around half where reproductive, and around one quarter where post-reproductive. Even though it is subjective, and motherhood has the largest importance, it is not the only representation valued as both the younger and older stages of womanhood hold almost equal value rather than an over valuation of younger women as a sexual object. By Damien Marie AtHope...

Main deity or religious belief systems

Aniconism: the worship of an object symbolizing, but not representing god or an opposition to icons or idols. Animism: the belief that natural objects and phenomena and the universe itself possess souls and consciousness or the belief in spiritual beings or agencies. Anthropolatry: the worship of a human being such “holy person” possibly similar to a deity yet not as a full god. Anthropomorphism: the assignment of human shape and attributes to gods, animals, etc. Anthropopathism: the assignment of human feelings to a god or inanimate object. Anthropophuism: the assignment of human nature and emotions to god. Anthropotheism: the belief that the gods have human nature, or are only deified men. Bitheism: a belief in two gods (brothers/ father son) or two goddesses (sisters/ mother daughter). Deism: god created the universe and started it functioning, but is no longer actively involved in it. Deityism: is acceptance or belief in the existence or possible existence of deities or supernatural nonhuman beings. This can entail belief in existence of a god, gods, or supernatural beings without personal worship of them or even thinking it or they do not deserve honor or following, such as seen in some forms of buddhism. Demiurgism: the belief, in Platonism and some Gnostic sects, that the material and sensible world was created by a subordinate god under the direction of the supreme being. Ditheism: the belief or doctrine that there are two gods of equal power, possibly two antagonistic deities one a force for good and the other a force for evil. Duotheism: belief in the existence of precisely two deities usually framed as a god...