Who is My Hero?

“Hero: a person who is admired or idealized for courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities.” Is there a hero who inspired me? No, there was no one person who changed my life or gave me inspiration to be more. For me it is everyone around me, ones who reach for the stars, as well as those who are still lying on the floor. To me the flight of the ‘human will’ is not a one-way trip, not a one-time journey, nor a one-time slip. I gathered whom I am from everyone around me from ones who struggle to ones who are strong. I can learn from ones who think they know little to ones who think they are never wrong. I strive to learn from children and adults alike for it is the goal of becoming someone I like. I strive to learn from the suffering who teaches me the need to understand, show compassion, and never forget how to cherish every happy moment to its end. I strive to learn from the sure and empowered who remind me to hope and see happiness is not pretend. I strive to learn from the ones who are arrogant, loud, and forceful to be heard for they remind me of the need to be humble and not to be so limited wanting only to be understood that I forget to actively work in understanding others. Most of all I try to learn from every child’s wonder. How their feelings of wonder guide their perception so even old things can be seen as new. May I be an eternal seeker and learner, willing to...

Scientific Misinterpretations Promote Relativism

The scientific process is the most effective method humans have for learning about the natural world. Science is a body of knowledge, but it is also a process. Science is an exciting and dynamic process for discovering how the world works and building that knowledge into powerful and coherent frameworks. “The Scientific Method” is a term often conceived as a simple way to understand the basics of scientific testing. In fact, the Scientific Method represents how scientists usually write up the results of their studies (and how a few investigations are actually done), but it is a grossly oversimplified representation of how scientists generally build knowledge. The process of science is exciting, complex, and unpredictable. It involves many different people, engaged in many different activities, in many different orders. The reason many like to promote misinterpretations of scientific abilities to reach objective knowledge, objective reality, and objective ontological truths is when relativism or subjectivism reality seems possible it opens gaps in truth and often, allowing the addition of magic in the gaps. However, science is largely a way to ensure accountability for factual claims. A scientific theory is merely a way of organizing ideas that makes sense from evidence of the world. Scientific methods are merely ways of rejecting or supporting factual claims that emerge from theories. Therefore, some still say but “everything is relative.” I see this as a common statement of people who are over impressed by scientific misinterpretations or ones who are not holding to scientific realism, especially those prone to self-serving biases and who disregard the correspondence theory of truth. Any view explicitly embracing the idea that...

Axiology vs. Nihilism

Axiological (good can be known or communicated and things have value) Nihilism (value is baseless and nothing good can be known or communicated) Roughly, axiology believes in some amount of objective value and meaning in life, the other nihilism on the other hand denies value especially objective value or most meaning in life thus the two are in a sense against each other. Axiology, (from Greek axios, “worthy”; logos, “science”), also called Theory of Value, the philosophical study of goodness, or value, in the widest sense of these terms. Its significance lies (1) in the considerable expansion that it has given to the meaning of the term value and (2) in the unification that it has provided for the study of a variety of questions—economic, moral, aesthetic, and even logical. Roughly, nihilism is the belief that all values are baseless and that nothing can be known or communicated. It is often associated with extreme pessimism and a radical skepticism that condemns existence. A true nihilist would believe in nothing, have no loyalties, and no purpose other than, perhaps, an impulse to destroy. As an axiologist believer, myself I find it hard to follow nihilistic argument about there being no objective value and then the nihilist believer wishes to use logic as a objective tool in their defense. If one has not objective value as it seems nihilism wishes to project, how is it not then hindered by this same belief, for to me if there can be no objective standard of value there can be no logical arguments possible when nihilism is in play. Furthermore, it would seem without...