Explaining science to remove MISCONCEPTION

MISCONCEPTION: Science can only disprove ideas.   CORRECTION: This misconception is based on the idea of falsification, philosopher Karl Popper’s influential account of scientific justification, which suggests that all science can do is reject, or falsify, hypotheses — that science cannot find evidence that supports one idea over others. Falsification was a popular philosophical doctrine — especially with scientists — but it was soon recognized that falsification wasn’t a very complete or accurate picture of how scientific knowledge is built. In science, ideas can never be completely proved or completely disproved. Instead, science accepts or rejects ideas based on supporting and refuting evidence, and may revise those conclusions if warranted by new evidence or perspectives.   Science is a body of knowledge, but it is also a process. Science is an exciting and dynamic process for discovering how the world works and building that knowledge into powerful and coherent frameworks.   Scientists use all sorts of different reasoning modes at different times — and sometimes at the same time — when analyzing a problem. They also use their creativity to come up with new ideas, explanations, and tests. This isn’t an either/or choice between induction and deduction. Scientific analysis often involves jumping back and forth among different modes of reasoning and creative brainstorming! What’s important about scientific reasoning is not what all the different modes of reasoning are called, but the fact that the process relies on careful, logical consideration of how evidence supports or does not support an idea, of how different scientific ideas are related to one another, and of what sorts of things we can expect...

Reasoned Beliefs and Sound Judgment

I state often that my position is as a rationalist that utilizes methodological skepticism that before making a belief or confirming a position I try to reserve judgment or suspension of judgment not immediately deny or accept it If I am not informed about. If one states that all things in relation to humans are subjective is that an objective statement about all humans made by a human who only has a subjective ability. If the statement a thing is subjective by presupposition acknowledging at least an account of objective or is subjective what is left when one cannot confirm objective? But can’t we say that just not having the ability to prove a thing is not directly a conformation that objective is or will be for ever unprovable or universally unproven. Furthermore if one thinks objective is or will be for ever unprovable or universally unproven, are that saying they know this to be proven by a subjective only means? Moreover, if one holds that judgment is subjective how can one make objective statements claiming to know that judgment is actually subjective if one lacks objective ability or standard in trying to know or understand what is being judged or analyzed. A judgment is analytic if it “is evident by virtue of the meanings of the terms that occur in it.” A judgment is synthetic if one must look outside of itself for evidence. For example, the judgment A prop is analytic, because (as we’ve seen in the case of disjunction) we need only consider the subterms of A to determine whether A itself is a proposition. On...