Critical or Analytical Thinking and Suspension of Judgment, Disbelief or Belief

How is Critical Thinking Different from Analytical Thinking? Critical thinking involves: Critical Thinking consists of mental processes of discernment, analysis and evaluation, especially as it relates to what we hear by way of points that are raised or issues which are put forward for discussion. It includes the process of reflecting upon a tangible or intangible item in order to form a sound judgment that reconciles scientific evidence with common sense. Hence, Critical Thinking is most successful when it effectively blends our natural senses or feelings with our logic and intuition, all applied in a systematic manner. It involves the following main activities: Deeply evaluating how far information we are given is current, up-to-date and accurate. Checking for bias or unsubstantiated assumptions. Evaluating how far the evidence or opinions presented genuinely proves the point(s) claimed. Weighing up opinions, arguments or solutions against appropriate (usually logical) criteria. Making inferences from the data/information and filling in “gaps”. Taking a clear line of reasoning through to its logical conclusion. Checking whether the evidence/argument really support the conclusions. Analytical thinking involves: Analytical thinking is a thinking process or skill in which an individual has the ability to scrutinize and break down facts and thoughts into their strengths and weaknesses. It involves thinking in thoughtful, discerning ways, in order to solve problems, analyze data, and recall and use information. It involves the following main activities: Focusing on facts and evidence Analyzing data or information or systems Dissecting data/information and the analysis of complex things into simpler constituents Reasoning – thinking that is coherent and logical Partitioning, breakdown – an analysis into mutually exclusive categories Eliminating extraneous data...