Ethical Thinking or Moral Reasoning Should be Rational AND Emotional

Contradicting the Standard Stereotypes of Emotions and Reason There are certain stereotypes and common misconceptions about the relationship between cognition and affect. For example, it is common for people to say things that imply: that their emotions and reason are often in conflict with each other, that emotion and reason function independently of each other, that it is possible to be an emotional person (and hence do little reasoning), that it is possible to be a rational person (and hence experience little emotion) that rational persons are cold, mechanical, and lack such desirable traits as compassion and sympathy, that emotional persons are lively, energetic, and colorful (though they are poor reasoners or do not follow their reasoning when making decisions), In this view one must give up the possibility of a rich emotional life if one decides to become a rational person, Likewise, one must give up rationality if one is to live life as a passionate, highly motivated person would. These ways of talking do not, in my view, make sense of who and what we are. Rather they support a myth that is an albatross on all our thinking about who and what we are. They lead us away from realizing that there is thinking that underlies our emotions and the emotions that drive our thinking. They lead us to think of thought and emotion as if they were oil and water, rather than inseparable constituents of human cognition. They lead us to think that there is nothing we can do to control our emotional life, when in fact there is much we can do. Ref Emotion and...