Shamanistic rock art from central Aboriginal Siberians and Aboriginal drums in the Americas

Some of the first nomadic peoples entered Siberia about 50,000 years ago.   Oldest Paleolithic Rock Art in Siberia between 8,000 and 10,000 years ago in the form of drawings of horses and bison scratched into rocks. Archaeologists are also hoping to find Paleolithic settlements or camps—traces of the people who left these drawings carved in stone. So far, who they were is entirely unknown. The drawings are at a site on the Ukok plateau on the Russian-Mongolian border near Kazakhstan where there is a modern tungsten-molybdenum mine, the Kalgutinskoye. There are more recent petroglyphs at the site. Researchers have run into problems in dating the Paleolithic-style drawings. But French researchers who studied the petroglyphs agree: They are even more ancient than previously believed,  reports Siberian Times. Speaking to Siberian Times, an archaeologist specializing in Siberia, Dr. Lidia Zotkina, said: We believe that we managed to prove that the petroglyphs were made in the Paleolithic era – and are the most ancient in Siberia. When the French archaeologists first arrived on the Ukok plateau and saw the petroglyphs they said: “If we had found them somewhere in France, we would not doubt they are Paleolithic, but here, in Siberia, we need to prove it.”’ The prehistoric people who drew the petroglyphs etched them onto glacier-polished rhyolite on horizontal planes. Rhyolite is a volcanic rock. The windy conditions on the Ukok plateau prevent scientists from obtaining a clear stratigraphy, or geological dating, of the rocks upon which the glyphs are drawn. Archaeologists also cannot use the usual archaeological methods of dating the drawings and will need to come up with new or innovative methods to...