Religious Trauma Syndrome?

Religious Trauma Syndrome by Marlene Winell Religious Trauma Syndrome is the condition experienced by people who are struggling with leaving an authoritarian, dogmatic religion and coping with the damage of indoctrination. They may be going through the shattering of a personally meaningful faith and/or breaking away from a controlling community and lifestyle.  RTS is a function of both the chronic abuses of harmful religion and the impact of severing one’s connection with one’s faith.  It can be compared to a combination of PTSD and Complex PTSD (C-PTSD). This is a summary followed by a series of three articles which were published in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Today. Religious Trauma Syndrome has a very recognizable set of symptoms, a definitive set of causes, and a debilitating cycle of abuse. There are ways to stop the abuse and recover. Symptoms of Religious Trauma Syndrome:   • Cognitive: Confusion, poor critical thinking ability, negative beliefs about self-ability & self-worth, black & white thinking, perfectionism, difficulty with decision-making   • Emotional: Depression, anxiety, anger, grief, loneliness, difficulty with pleasure, loss of meaning   • Social: Loss of social network, family rupture, social awkwardness, sexual difficulty, behind schedule on developmental tasks   • Cultural: Unfamiliarity with secular world; “fish out of water” feelings, difficulty belonging, information gaps (e.g. evolution, modern art, music)   Causes of Religious Trauma Syndrome:   Authoritarianism coupled with toxic theology which is received and reinforced at church, school, and home results in:   • Suppression of normal child development – cognitive, social, emotional, moral stages are arrested   • Damage to normal thinking and feeling abilities -information is limited and controlled;...

Damien, how do you feel about agnostics?

“Damien, how do you feel about agnostics, such as myself. I admire some of the values of some religions as a guide to life, but I get to choose. I am with Pascal and Einstein, I don’t think the concept of God is rational, but I lose nothing by being a decent person, just in case.” Questioner   My response, how you pose the question of how I feel about agnostics, seems to infer the people who are agnostic unless I am misunderstanding, and on such a question of how I feel towards my fellow humans, I strive to treat them humanistically, fairly, and equally. If you are instead asking if I am consenting in any way to agnostic thinking, my answer would unequivocally state no. I see agnostic thinking as a flaw in reasoning that seems to at least in someway accept the empty assertions of religion. I always work to attack thinking and not people. Furthermore, I have friends on Facebook that are religious and don’t attack or even give them a hard time, I just address my thinking on my pages not at anyone unless they challenge me or the like.   Theists and Atheists as well as Agnostics? My Anti-Agnostic Atheism Thinking   Discussions on Agnosticism and Atheism...