The Bad god Concept or Just the god Who Wasn’t Ever There

I get that my harsh critiques of the god concept to you may be foreign and you may feel that you don’t see it how I see it. But I put forward that the god concept is a well packaged container of emptiness masqueraded as the elixir of life. The god concept to me is a web of lies polished and glorified as the end all do all even though it is empty of all facts to warrant any holding as true. This bogus god concept has been sold so insidiously to the masses through gradual indoctrination of one generation after another that my truth exposing the fallaciousness of the god concept may to one from the indoctrinated seem so utterly preposterous that I as is orator seem like a raving lunatic when in actuality I am clearly professing the...

Pre-Pottery Neolithic Skull Cult

11,500 – 8,400 Years Ago – Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (11,500 – 10,500 years ago) and B (10,500 – 8,400 years ago).   There were mortuary practice differences between communities in the Levant and Near East, although it should be noted that pottery, was not used in the Levant until 7,500 years ago. Ritual behavior during the Pre-Pottery Neolithic is quite remarkable, indicated by the presence of large human figurines at sites such as ‘Ain Ghazal, and plastered skulls at ‘Ain Ghazal, Jericho, Beisomoun, and Kfar HaHoresh. A plastered skull was made by modeling a plaster replica of skin and features onto a human skull. In some cases, cowry shells were used for eyes and sometimes they were painted using cinnabar or other iron-rich element. The Pre-Pottery Neolithic A areas included Jericho, Netiv Hagdud, Nahul Oren, Gesher, Dhar’, Jerf al Ahmar, Abu Hureyra, Gobekli Tepe, and Chogha Golan. Generally, during the PPNA, the vast majority of burials appear to have been single, primary, and articulated. However, there are indications that secondary burials may have been present at Jericho as well as at Netiv Hagdud. Graves seem to have been concentrated in the area of the tower at Jericho, which may represent the way to the afterlife. At Catal Huyuk, we see the symbolism of a tower possibly representing sending the dead to the afterlife, which is seen in murals that depict headless bodies being taken and placed on top of the tower and in which birds take pieces of the bodies away. Yet, elsewhere there is little in the way of evidence for separate cemetery areas within habitation sites or...