Scientific Realism & Scientific Anti-Realism?

Though scientists are likely to hold philosophic scientific realism & anti-realism conclusions they may hold such opinions without understanding they actually hold such a stance. This mainly is because many scientists rarely become philosophical about what their equations mean for reality.   The following two theses will help us in the formulation of realism and anti-realism: The observable thesis: We can have knowledge of the observable aspects of the world. The unobservable thesis: We can have knowledge of the unobservable aspects of the world.   Here is the scientific Realism & scientific anti-realism theories more defined:   Scientific Realism   Scientific Realism: We can have knowledge of the observable aspects of the world. Likewise we can have knowledge of the unobservable aspects of the world. Or we have very good reason to believe that the unobservable entities postulated by well-confirmed theories exist. Scientific Realism: Science aims to produce, and has succeeded in producing, true/approximately true claims about both the observable and the unobservable aspects of the world.   Scientific Anti-Realism   1. Scientific Anti-Realism “Constructive empiricism”: We have no good reason to suppose that such entities exist. The evidence which supports scientific theories supports only the claim that such theories are “empirically adequate” – that what they say about observable entities is true. We have no reason to suppose that what they say about unobservable entities is true.   2. Scientific Anti-Realism “Instrumentalism”: This is a thesis about the meaning of “theoretical” terms (i.e. terms which appear to refer to unobservable entities). Instrumentalists claim that such terms don’t really refer to any such entities. A theory employing theoretical terms...

Someone Cares?

Some people like to say that there are hardly any people who are good. And some of the people who hold this view believe it’s a justification for not caring. Well if you think this is true then it’s all the more incumbent upon us to then strive to be that good person in the world who not only cares but inspires others to care. May I always strive to be that good person who...

Grief While Having Atheistic Disbelief

“Damien, I have a question for you. I am a hospice nurse. I am an atheist. What is the best way to comfort my patients after the priest visits…and questions their ability to “go to heaven”. This has happened more than once. While religiosity is a sign of delirium, calming a patient from that state is extremely difficult, no matter how much haledol you have. They are still convinced they will burn in hell because a priest told them they ” don’t know” what will happen. What can I say? The priests tend to horrify them with the Lazerus story. What can I do…to comfort them….which in turn..comforts a family?”   My response, I would check out: http://www.griefbeyondbelief.org/ “The aim of Grief Beyond Belief is to facilitate peer-to-peer grief support for atheists, Humanists, and other Freethinkers by providing spaces free of religion, spiritualism, mysticism, and evangelism in which to share sorrow and offer the comfort of rational compassion.”   As far as my advice, well try to have eyes of love. You don’t have to compete with religion, instead show what is real, care and compassion. I value humanity, so I strive to put people over beliefs or disbeliefs, we are all valuable humans needing kindness in times of trouble. I would just be human, comforting, listening, understanding and accepting them as a fellow being of dignity and try to share my humanity as best I can. I may also not focus on morning the suffering or possible loss but would celebrate their life talk about their value to you and others or to the world or just what they...