The power of hope?

The power of hope?   One reason I changed my last name to AtHope to mean “At” “Hope” a state of being I live in and I wish for others.   According to the Kirsten Weir with the American Psychological Association, “Hope is associated with many positive outcomes, including greater happiness, better academic achievement and even lowered risk of death. It’s a necessary ingredient for getting through tough times, of course, but also for meeting everyday goals. Everyone benefits from having hope — and psychologists’ research suggests almost anyone can be taught to be more hopeful. “Hope doesn’t relate to IQ or to income,” says psychologist Shane Lopez, Ph.D., a senior scientist at Gallup and author of the 2013 book “Making Hope Happen.” “Hope is an equal opportunity resource.” What precisely is hope? Most psychologists who study the feeling favor the definition developed by the late Charles R. Snyder, PhD, a psychologist at the University of Kansas and a pioneer of hope research. His model of hope has three components: goals, agency, and pathways. Put simply, “agency” is our ability to Ph.D.shape our lives — the belief that we can make things happen, and the motivation to reach a desired outcome. The pathways are how we get there — the routes and plans that allow us to achieve the goal, whether that’s adopting a child, finding a better job, surviving a hurricane or just losing a few pounds. Unsurprisingly, optimism and hope are closely related. Even during the darkest days of her adoption struggle, the ever-optimistic James-Enger never stopped being hopeful. “I’m definitely a glass-half-full type — maybe even...