Traces of Totemism In Judaism  

Traces of Totemism In Judaism   Totemism (theoretical belief in a mythical relationship with powers/spirits through a totem item). Believe in spirit-filled life and/or afterlife can be attached to or be expressed in things or objects (you are a hidden totemist/Totemism: an approximately 50,000-year-old belief system) “A totem is any species of plants or animals thought to possess supernatural powers. Each group within the society may have its own totem, including associated ceremonies. Totemic beliefs may not be as foreign to the Western mind as first expected; many Westerners have totems. School mascots, symbols, and emblems all constitute totems.” Ref “The investigation of totemism is strictly the work of the anthropologist. Its mention in a study of this kind is necessitated by the fact that some maintain that the idea of a god was evolved from the idea of a totem and that honors to a god were but a form of magnification of honors to a totem. The eating of a sacrifice offered to a god was accordingly explained upon the basis of eating the god and thus incorporating his qualities. It is maintained by some and contested by others that every tribe of people has retained vestiges of original totemism and that therefore totemism is a true ancestor of religion. Scholars differ upon the thesis of the universality of early totemism. Totemistic practices are widely variant and totemism itself is a social philosophy rather than a religious tenet. Moreover, it is not necessary to suppose that the social and religious development of every people has been mechanically identical. After the entrance of human intellect and will upon the scene, it is...

Ok, you seem confused so let’s talk about Buddhism.

Do you really know about buddhism? Buddhism has gods like polytheistic deism; “without asserting any deities created the universe” What is buddhism’s holy books or writing and some info them? According to religion facts in buddhism, there are a vast number of Buddhist scriptures and religious texts, which are commonly divided into the categories of canonical and non-canonical. The former, also called the Sutras (Sanskrit) or Suttas (Pali) are believed to be, either literally or metaphorically, the actual words of the buddha. The latter are commentaries on canonical texts, other treatises on the dharma, and collections of quotes, histories, grammars, etc. This categorization is not universal, however: there will always be texts that cross boundaries, or that belong in more than one category. Moreover, zen buddhism rejects scriptures altogether as an ineffective path to enlightenment. The articles below provide overviews of some of the most notable buddhist texts. Tripitaka (Pali Canon) The Tripitaka (Tipitaka in Pali) in Theravada buddhism is the earliest collection of buddhist teachings and the only text recognized as canonical by Theravada buddhists. The collection is also referred to as the Pali Canon, after the language in which it was first written. It is a vast collection of writings, comprising up to 50 volumes. Many commentaries have been added over the centuries, however. Tripitaka means “three baskets,” from the way in which it was originally recorded: the text was written on long, narrow leaves, which were sewn at the edges then grouped into bunches and stored in baskets. Mahayana Sutras Mahayana buddhism reveres the Tripitaka as a sacred text but adds to it the Sutras, which reflect distinctively Mahayana...