Bullying Facts, Bullying Statistics

Bullying Facts, Bullying Statistics:   Bullied victims are 7 to 9 % more likely to consider suicide according to a study by Yale University. Studies in Britain have found half of the suicides among youth related to bullying. According to a study by ABC News over 30,000 children stay home every day due to the fear of being bullied. Bullying can be related to physical, emotional, cyberbullying, and sexting, i.e. circulating nude or suggestive pictures or messages about of a person.   The Urban Institute’s study on bullying showed 17 % of students reported being victims of cyberbullying, 41 % victims of physical bullying, and 15 % experienced different kinds. The types and rates of bullying varied according to gender in this study. About 50 % of girls experienced psychological bullying, and 45 percent males physical bullying.   The Center For Disease Control reported that students that experience bullying are twice as likely to suffer from various problems. These include depression, sleep difficulties, anxiety, and trouble adjusting to school. They are twice as likely to get stomach-aches and headaches.   The National Center for Educational Statistics reports that in 2014 1 of 3 students reported being bullied during the school year. In the National Crime Victimization Survey of 2014 about 64.5 % reported incidents that occurred twice in the year. About 18.5 % reported incidents reported bullying twice a month, and 7.8 % reported bullying being bullied daily.   According to another study, by J. Anderson, Many students reported bullying that involved being made fun of and called names. Other methods of bullying were having rumors spread about them,...

Moral fear and Moral love (which together motivate my axiological ethics)?

Moral fear and Moral love (which together motivate my axiological ethics)? Harm is often a violation of trust and a violation of expected trust makes bad things even worse like if I told you a child was killed, you would feel it was terrible but if I further told you it was the child’s doctor that murdered the child out of anger. You would be more angered as doctors are expected to care for people not harm them. And if you think that is bad what if I further told you the doctor who killed the child was her mother would you hold her even mone in contempt as mothers also are expected to care and not kill children, so a violation of trust is terrible and even makes things worse. Therefore, we can see why people that hold places of trust should never abuse them, and that we should hold them accountable if they do violate such trust by harming others. Morality first, that is morality should be at the forefront in all I do. I hope I am always strong enough to put my morality at the forefront in all I do, so much so, that it is obvious in the ways I think and behave. To better grasp, a naturalistic morality one should see the perspective of how there is a self-regulatory effect on the self-evaluative moral emotions, such as shame and guilt. Broadly conceived, self-regulation distinguishes between two types of motivation: approach/activation and avoidance/inhibition. one should conceptually understand the socialization dimensions (parental restrictiveness versus nurturance), associated emotions (anxiety versus empathy), and forms of morality (proscriptive versus prescriptive) that...

Justice in the Workplace: morality/ethical dimensions

The Oxford Handbook of Justice in the Workplace (by Russell Cropanzano & Maureen L. Ambrose)   Scholarship on justice and affect have expanded dramatically in recent years, spanning investigations of the relationships between justice and discrete emotions as well as justice and affective dimensions (e.g ., valence). The present chapter summarizes and builds on the later developments by exploring how several leading theories of justice can organize and lend insight to research that takes a dimensional approach to affect. In particular, we explore the valence dimension of affect in relation to the self-interest model of justice, the uncertainty dimension of affect in relation to the uncertainty management model of justice, the morality dimension of affect in relation to the deontic model of justice and the social dimension of affect in relation to the relational models of justice. We also discuss the value of the dimensional approach for organizing prior findings, highlighting novel insights, and identifying new pathways for justice research. Most prominently, a number of scholars have explored moral outrage in association with perceived injustice. However, justice research examining moral outrage does not always distinguish it from related emotions, such as anger, that may be invoked by self-interest (rather than social concerns) and may motivate actions that are not prosocial. Inattention to this distinction may be attributed to a focus solely on discrete emotions and not also on the morality/ethical dimension of emotions. For example, recipients of injustice may feel angry simply because they perceive that their outcomes are unfair or unfavorable, and thus selfish concerns rather than concern about the violations of morality/ethical codes that govern society may elicit...