Totemism: an approximately 50,000-year-old belief system?

In a general way, Totemism is sacralizing relationships expressed by metaphorical connection imparted items or behavior with people. Seen most commonly in current religious food taboos and sacrifice as well as sacred art (whether real or metaphorical and be it a behavior, thing, or person being sacrificed). “A totem is a spirit being, sacred object, or symbol that serves as an emblem of a group of people, such as a family, clan, lineage, or tribe.” – Wikipedia Totemism | religion | Britannica.com  “Totemism, system of belief in which humans are said to have kinship or a mystical relationship with a spirit-being, such as an animal or plant. The entity, or totem, is thought to interact with a given kin group or an individual and to serve as their emblem or symbol. The term totemism has been used to characterize a cluster of traits in the religion and in the social organization of many peoples. Totemism is manifested in various forms and types in different contexts and is most often found among populations whose traditional economies relied on hunting and gathering, mixed farming with hunting and gathering, or emphasized the raising of cattle. The term totem is derived from the Ojibwa word ototeman, meaning “one’s brother-sister kin.” The grammatical root, ote, signifies a blood relationship between brothers and sisters who have the same mother and who may not marry each other. In English, the word totem was introduced in 1791 by a British merchant and translator who gave it a false meaning in the belief that it designated the guardian spirit of an individual, who appeared in the form of an animal—an idea that the Ojibwa clans did indeed portray by their wearing of animal skins. It was reported at the end of the 18th century that...

The Pseudohistoric and Pseudoscientific claims about “Bakoni Ruins” of South Africa

The Pseudohistoric and Pseudoscientific claims about “Bakoni Ruins” of South Africa Info on PSEUDOARCHAEOLOGY Micheal Tellinger claims of Bakoni Ruins being from prehistory is false pseudoscience. According to author Michael Tellinger Michael Tellinger and the Counterfactual Romance of Ancient Astronauts According to author Jason Colavito, “In reading this month’s Fortean Times, I discovered that he is not the only musician questing after an alternative to science. An advertisement informs me that South African musician and actor Michael Tellinger has adopted Zecharia Sitchin’s ideas as truth and has a new book called African Temples of the Anunnaki, a follow-up to 2005’s Slave Species of God, which he advertised as the culmination of twenty-five years of study of… wait for it… Zecharia Sitchin. Tellinger’s ideas are unsupportable even by the loose standards of ancient astronaut idiocy. On the home page for Slave Species, Tellinger asks “Why do all mythologies have the same group of GODS?” I imagine this will come as a bit of shock to the Aztec that their gods are identical to those of China and Greece. Even within the Indo-European family of religions, we are hard-pressed to find identical gods; Odin, Frigg, Freya, and Thor do not precisely match the Greek gods; Freya, for example, has aspects the Greeks divided among Aphrodite, Athena, and Persephone. Even two myth systems we today think of as virtually identical—Greece and Rome—have challenging difficulties, not least the startling difference between the bloodthirsty berserker Ares and the beneficent farming warrior Mars. Again, Tellinger asks: “Why is the FLYING SERPENT the creator god in all mythologies?” Do I even need to say that it is not? Without getting into the question of whether Tellinger means...

No Magic Zone: including politics and religion

No Magic Zone: including politics and religion.   I am against all supernatural, superstition, pseudomorality, pseudohistory, and pseudoscience. And I am against anything that intentionally sacralizes.  Sacralize? Sacralize: to imbue with or treat as having a sacred character or quality. “Rural images that sacralize country life or inner-city images that sacralize urban life,” sacralization, noun, the act or process of acquiring sanctity in a religious context. For sacralization as a social or political phenomenon, see political religion; verb (used with object), sacralized, sacralizing. To make sacred; imbue with a sacred character, especially through ritualized devotion: a society that sacralized “special” figures. In addition to basic forms of politics, like parliament and elections, it also holds an aspect of sacralization related to the institutions contained within the regime and also provides the inner measures traditionally considered to be religious territory, such as ethics, values, symbols, myths, rituals and for example a national liturgical calendar. Political religious organizations, such as the Nazi Party, adhered to the idealization of cultural and political power over the country at large. The church body of the state no longer held control over the practices of religious identity. Because of this, Nazism was countered by many political and religious organizations as being a political religion, based on the dominance which the Nazi regime had (Gates and Steane). Political religions generally vie with existing traditional religions and may try to replace or eradicate them. The theory of political religion concerns governmental ideologies whose cultural and political backing is so strong that they are said to attain power equivalent to those of a state religion, with which they...