Caring Firebrand Atheist Activism Event: Indianapolis, In. May 5

Caring Firebrand Atheist Activism event: Saturday, May 5 at 1 PM – 3 PM EDT Indianapolis, Indiana: link I am a firebrand atheist, but to me, there is no right way to be an atheist. Atheism is done right if it is stopping belief in gods and it is not for everyone to have to be outspoken to the world as if that is the only worthy atheism style. I have been helped a lot by atheists just being my friend and supporting me never even telling anyone they are atheist. If you can and it is safe and you want to being out as an atheist can be rewarding but it is not an all or nothing. We all do a lot supporting each other in the cause of a reality devoid of god superstitions. I was asked if I was an angry atheist. No, I am not an angry atheist but I am a firebrand atheist, so I am outspoken. Though my moto is, attack thinking not people. I believe in people I just don’t believe in gods or religions. If religious people comment on my page I try to inform them not abuse them. I want to make a positive difference in the world with my atheism. But I am also not just limited to nonbelief as I am a humanist. So I try to inspire care for others as well not just rejection of gods and religion. Let’s do atheism with style. When you realize the word spiritual means nothing, it hits you right in the face. Many who now deeply grasp justice, were themselves victims of injustice. I once was an innocent child, religion...

Black women of Courage: Elizabeth Jennings, Claudette Colvin, Rosa Parks, and Coretta Scott King.

Elizabeth Jennings (event July 16, 1854): Before Claudette Colvin and Rosa Parks, Elizabeth Jennings by Jaya Saxena Most American students learn about Rosa Parks, the African American civil rights activist who was famously refused to give up her bus seat to a white passenger in 1955. A few learn of Claudette Colvin, a teenager who was arrested for the same crime earlier that same year in Montgomery, Alabama, and whose testimony in Browder v. Gayle helped end bus segregation in Alabama. But few learn of Elizabeth Jennings (later Elizabeth Jennings Graham), an African American woman who, over 100 years earlier, sparked the end of transportation segregation in New York City. In the 1850s, horse-drawn streetcars were a common mode of transportation, and were run by private companies, giving their owners and drivers the power to decide who to serve. On July 16, 1854 Elizabeth Jennings was running late for work as an organist at the First Colored Congregational Church. She hopped on a streetcar labeled “whites only” at Pearl and Chatham Streets, but the conductor ordered her off. When she refused, the conductor and a policeman forcefully removed her. Elizabeth Jennings’ father, Thomas Jennings, was the first African American to receive a US patent (for a Dry Cleaning method), and rallied to her cause. Her family and church formed a legal rights association, and hired a young Chester A. Arthur (the one who’d go on to be President) as her attorney. In 1855 they achieved a court victory, which led to the desegregation of New York City’s public transportation, 100 years before the fight in Alabama. Jennings went on to establish New York’s first African American kindergarten in her...