Religious OCD Subtype?

Religious OCD Subtype?   by Ghazel Tellawi, M.A.   Religious thoughts can become intrusive and distressing in individuals with OCD. These thoughts can involve intrusive religious blasphemous thoughts, compulsive prayer, hypermorality, unwarranted concern about committing a sin, and cleaning/washing rituals (Himle, Chatters, Taylor & Nguyen, 2001). These thoughts sometimes become problematic, and are referred to as “scrupulosity.” Scrupulosity describes the relationship between religiosity and the symptoms of OCD, and individuals with these obsessions often focus on certain details of their religion while ignoring others.   OCD and Religious OCD Overview?   Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is considered a type of anxiety disorder that involves recurring, unwanted obsessions and repetitive compulsions. Obsessions are intrusive thoughts that cause severe distress, despite the fact that the individual realizes that the obsessions represent exaggerated fears that are not likely to occur. These obsessions are worries that reach beyond anxiety about everyday problems. So upsetting are the obsessions that the individual attempts to counteract them with a specific behavior or neutralizing thought called a compulsion. The individual feels as though their compulsions must be performed in response to the obsessions. Compulsions are implemented strictly to reduce anxiety or prevent a feared outcome. One large study found that scrupulous obsessions in OCD were ranked as the fifth most common obsession, with 6% of participants endorsing it as their primary obsession. Additionally, it has been estimated that religious obsessions occur in 25% of individuals with OCD (Antony, Dowie, & Swinson, 1998). One study showed that OCD symptoms presentation can be influenced by one’s religion and culture (Sica, Novara, Sanavio, Dorz & Coradeschi, 2002). Abramowitz, Deacon, Woods, & Tolin (2004)...

How could a religion be a lie is it because it’s not true?

“Damien, how could a religion be a lie is it because it’s not true? With my definition of a lie there must be agency. A lie is the intent to deceive. How would you go about defining a lie in the religious context? I hope you don’t mind my questions I enjoy learning about others position as I know mine is not perfect I may adopt something from yours.” – Questioner  Types of religion lying? ”Bad faith” lies, eroding the acknowledgement of one’s own ability to act and determine one’s possibilities self-efficiency and self-mastery instead requires reliance on the religion, god, holy person/pastor/priest or holy book/some other believed sacred thing. 1 ”Bald-faced” lies, lie such as talking donkeys in the bible (Numbers 22:28-30) or flying horses (Sahih al-Bukhari, 5:58:227 an Islamic holy book) are lies that are obviously a lies. 1 “Big lie” lies, a lie which attempts to trick the victim into believing something major which will likely be contradicted by some information the victim already possesses, or by their common sense. Say for instance the promotion of magic as real. Some religions claim that praying for somebody who is sick can have positive effects on the health of the person being prayed for. Magic is not real, never was, so to keep professing magic as a real thing to the contrary of reality, such as the nonsense belief of prayer even after it was tested and of course it failed (STEP study 2006) but the vigorous support of prayer not lessened at all, so it is promoting a “Big lie.” 1 2 “Bluffing” lies, to pretend to have a capability or...

What is bible and Who is jesus???

“Damien, who is jesus???” – Questioner My response, well to me, jesus is the title name given to the purposed personage of Yeshua, a prominent character in the bible’s new testament stories some claim was a son of god and also the father god as well as a presumed external spirit being forming a trinity, both acknowledged as three separate being yet also claimed to still be one ad the same person; yeah it makes no sense. “Damien, what is bible ???” Questioner My response, the bible is Christian scriptures, consisting of the 66 books of the Old and New Testaments. I see the bible like pretty much how I see all holy books, that they are obviously man made works of historical fiction and dogmatic propaganda generally with some amount pseudoscience, pseudohistory, and pseudomorality. I see all holy books as the propaganda for religions that are organized lying. “Damien you said, “to you religions are organized lying.” If your definition of truth is “the intent to deceive” then I cannot see how someone who believes can be considered lying. Can you help me with this Damien?” – Questioner My response, I see religions are organized lying (dogmatic propaganda generally with some amount pseudoscience, pseudohistory, and pseudomorality) telling nontruth as if it is proven real without evidence and disproof against such assertions as pseudotruth, not a possibility of truth, no pseudotruth is offered as fact, which is lying. “Maybe as a system religion is a lie but my grandmother really did believe that she was going to heaven before she died. Would you say that she was lying?” – Questioner...

Atheist Morality = Scientific Morality?

Atheist Morality:  Some atheists don’t really address the philosophical arguments of atheistic anti-humanism from atheistic humanism.   I am and was dissatisfied with what to me was a lack of scientific core in secular morality. Thus, looked for and found what I was hoping for in Formal Axiology (scientific value theory) which is a social science.  I wish to promote common sense, thus challenge thinking that is flated or in error and bad behaviors as well as promote positive humanism and wish for human flourishing as people have dignity and what they may believe has no dignity. And, as far as what I want when it comes to beliefs, I wish to inspire the ethics of belief such as that which is needed in ones increased accuracy of beliefs. We should be thoughtful in belief acquisition, be open in our belief. maintenance, and intellectually honest in our belief relinquishment. This Guardian link is a interesting article close to the dissatisfied way I think some who are atheists seem to avoid or struggle in navigating the difference between anti-humanism and humanism. Which if not we’ll defined confuses the arguments especially in clearly relating atheistic morality in general. To me, it seems many atheists either somehow adopt quasi religious moral thinking try with little substance to core out a moral middle or reject morality entirely in either a relativistic or nihilism way. I reject that line of thinking and see morality as originating outside of religion, involving evolutionary scientific and objective and supported by Formal Axiology which has been proven empirically valid. I mainly hold to objective morality but I do believe morality at...

Bible Cosmology is Laughable

It’s been calculated that the observable Universe is a bubble of space 47 billion years in all directions. Your god concept is pitifully small and your religion’s self-importance is too big. Ancient man was limited to what he could see. Therefore his god myth is small and limited in our understanding now, and we can see the self-importance is too big when it’s only fixed to this tiny little earth and an extremely limited concept of the heavens around it. Their god did not seem to see past the limited sight man could see. Thus we can see how pitiful and limited god and religion truly is. Bible cosmology is laughable. “God said He would multiply Israel as the stars of heaven.” – 1 Chronicles 27:23 “God made their sons as numerous as the stars of heaven.” – Nehemiah 9:23 “as many descendants as the stars of the heaven are in number.” – Hebrews 11:12 “Look to the heavens: Who created all these? He who brings out the starry host one by one and calls forth each of them by name. Because of his great power and mighty strength, not one of them is missing.” – Isaiah 40:26 “God determines the number of the stars in the heavens and calls them each by name.” – Psalm 147:4 “God made the two great lights, the greater light to govern the day, and the lesser light to govern the night; He made the stars also.” – Genesis 1:16 “Praise Him, sun and moon; Praise Him, all stars of light! Praise Him, highest heavens, And the waters that are above the heavens!”...

Theological Noncognitivist & Ignosticism

Theological noncognitivism is the argument that religious language – specifically, words such as “god” – are not cognitively meaningful. It is sometimes considered as synonymous with ignosticism. 1   I see Theological noncognitivism as a kind of duel attack a semantic/logical and a reasoned psychological that the mind must be able to conceptualize.   I see Ignosticism as using the Theological noncognitivism arguments of “mind understanding issues” (rationalism challenging) and an evidentialist/verificationist arguments of “lacking evidence issues” (empiricism challenging).   Ignosticism or igtheism is the idea that every theological position assumes too much about the concept of god and other theological concepts; including (but not limited to) concepts of faith, spirituality, heaven, hell, afterlife, damnation, salvation, sin and the soul. Moreover, Ignosticism is the view that any religious term or theological concept presented must be accompanied by a coherent definition. Without a clear definition such terms cannot be meaningfully discussed. Such terms or concepts must also be falsifiable. Lacking this, an ignostic takes the theological noncognitivist position that the existence or nature of the terms presented (and all matters of debate) is meaningless. For example, if the term “god” does not refer to anything reasonably defined then there is no conceivable method to test against the existence of god. Therefore, the term “god” has no literal significance and need not be debated or discussed. Ignosticism and theological noncognitivism are similar although whereas the ignostic says “every theological position assumes too much about the concept of god”, the theological noncognitivist claims to have no concept whatever to label as “a concept of god”, but the relationship of ignosticism to other nontheistic...