“Happy Easter” Well Happy Eostre/Ishter

Easter: Eostre a Teutonic goddess The exact origins of Easter as a religious day’s name are somewhat unknown. Some sources claim the word Easter is derived from Eostre, a Teutonic goddess of spring and fertility and because Eostre who was the goddess of dawn and spring, that is why “east” the region in which the sun rises, shares the same root as “Easter.” Teutonic denots the Germanic branch of the Indo-European language family. From Latin Teutonicus, from Teutones, Teutoni, name of a tribe that inhabited coastal Germany near the mouth of the Elbe, probably via Celtic from Proto-Germanic *theudanoz, from Proto-Indo-European *teuta-, the common word for “people, tribe.” To put this, in a broader understanding in the past Proto-Indo-European referred to by many scholars as Aryans and Germany in Finnish is Saksa “Land of the Saxons. The Teutonic Knights (founded 1191) were a military order of German knights formed for service in the Holy Land, but who later crusaded in then-pagan Prussia and Lithuania. According to some archaeologists, PIE speakers cannot be assumed to have been a single, identifiable people or tribe, but were a group of loosely related populations ancestral to the later, still partially prehistoric, Bronze Age Indo-Europeans. The Anatolian hypothesis proposes that the Indo-European languages spread peacefully into Europe from Asia Minor or modern day Turkey which has parts in the Fertile Crescent and PIE speakers may come from modern day Turkey around 9000 years ago with the wave of farming spreading into Europe. Proto-Indo-European religion roots of Easter or Eostre in Anatolian (Asia Minor or modern day Turkey) dialects is Estan, Istanus, Istara. Pagan Anglo-Saxons...